Your Personal Renaissance

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Feeling a bit under water?

We can get busy with life, so busy that we lose track of who we are and what we want and who we most want to be.

If that sounds like you at least sometimes, then you are not alone.

If that sounds like you, I have the perfect little get-a-way this January, less than 2 hours from Chicago.

If you’d like to reclaim your inner creative kid, join us.

If you could just use some quiet and beauty, join us.

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Let’s help your inner muse bloom.

Learn more and register here. Space is limited to make sure you feel well cared for.

 

What You Seek…

Is seeking you

Jimmy’s Tree

This tree has lived a long time. Longer than the landlords who own this land know actually .

Trees have a different sense of time than we short lived humans do. It’s sheltered many animals over the years. Squirrels, woodpeckers. Seen many people through good times and hard ones.

Provided sheltering cover during hard times.

This tree has given so much. And has in return been loved.Friends have gathered around and beneath her. Gardens have grown. Love has come and gone. Children once small are now adults flying free from the nest.A full harvest of love and loss, the full spectrum of life has danced here. And now, some say it’s time for tree to be cut down. It’s limbs are old and brittle. They could fall and cause injuries.

What if there was a different story?

The tree might be tended. Yes, she is elderly, requiring care.

But so don’t we all?

What if we made that offering?

Shared our love for the community and sheltered a little longer under here sweet branches, sang a few more songs, danced slowly into the twilight together?

Portraits in Meditation

“Our life is what our thoughts make it.” – Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Thanks to Samara of @blueislandmedicine for braving the October chill and encountering your ideas about coldness with a fresh approach.

Salutes to all the creative ladies out there digging in every single day to find strength, courage and the superpowers to carry on. It’s not easy but the choice is to live without the vital juice of life.

Our focus determines our reality.

Meditation and other mindfulness practices help us stay flexible and alive to the magic of life.

I’m working on a series of portraits of people sitting in meditation to explore the nature of stillness using my camera. Some of the exposures ate quite long, from a minute or two up to an hour.

Often we focus these days on efficiency and speed but I feel we need to ask is speed always necessary?

I believe it’s important to slow down and discover our lives as they unfold letting go of the same old stories we tell ourselves and instead encounter our life afresh.

I welcome you to join the exploration by sitting for a portrait and sharing your experiences with practicing mindfulness any form.

The Lift Bridge and Trees in Mist

The Lift Bridge and Trees in Mist, January 21, 2018 Chicago River, Chinatown, Chicago

Sinking Dock

Sinking Dock, Chicago River, Ping Tom Park, Chicago, Il January 22, 2018

New Group Show

Here is the photo selected for Woman Made Gallery’s Midwest Open running March 2-24, 2018.

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What an incredible honor to be amongst this group of 40 incredible artists chosen from 900 entries! I’m over the moon to be included. Thank you.

Opening Reception:

March 2, 2018 | 6-8pm (Friday)

The exhibition will be shown at WMG‘s new space in Chicago’s Pilsen Art District:
Woman Made Gallery
2150 S Canalport # 4A

New Photos at Second Friday

I will be showing new black and white photographs printed using Piezography, a unique process which offers tens of thousands of silver tones, greater than what can be found in even platinum or  palladium process printing. Limited edition, signed en verso.

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The Conversation
The images are slightly elegiac; an idea of movement but also stillness – the suspension of time. Long exposures distill several moments into one. Rather than a single decisive moment, it’s photographing the passage of time itself. They are connected as well to the writings of Woolf, Proust, Oliver, Dillard, Solnit and their explorations of perception and the passage of time and memory.
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Solitary Man
The work also explores the time between point of sense contact and the cognitive, physical and emotional response. “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom,” as Viktor Frankl had it.
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Garden Chairs 2

When We Don’t Know the Way Forward

The Budz Bridge In the Snow (from 18th St.)

When we don’t know the way forward, when we lack certainty, but push ahead anyway, thinking or maybe screaming, WTF! the way opens; we learn from failure, take those losses as a blessing however much we may truly hate it at the time.

The sheer force of doing something/anything propels us to discover and learn – perhaps we might even see that that place of not knowing is the best place ever.

Certainty is just another name for bullshit island. And who really wants to live there?

A History of Staring at Ceilings

For my entire life reaching as far back as I can remember, which varies at times in range, from perhaps the age of three or four and up, and occasionally even earlier, to those times before the acquisition of language, before the capacity to name.

I have distinct and specific memories of lying on the couch, or a bed for one reason or another: perhaps having been told to take a nap, or as an adult choosing to take a break, perhaps feeling depressed or sick, and other times savoring the beauty, the simple beauty of light as it fell through the window, or from a light on the ceiling, as it met the corner of the room, and sometimes the window.

These moments have always and still do contain an entire universe of possible emotions, a sense of deep connection to all that is; this deep feeling of potential, and at the same time a deep anxiety at the possibility of missed potential, missed opportunity.

I realize I still have that same exact set of feelings now.

The feelings vary; sometimes anxiety, sometimes joy, sometimes anticipation, the full range of human emotions.

My work arises from a desire to understand the ongoing stream of felt experiences along the full emotional continuum. This occurs via direct experiential processing, an ongoing , intuitive development of a visual photographic vocabulary.

This lexicon seeks to make visible the invisible: what do we see and how does it impact us and how are we in relationship to it?

It confronts the fundamental reality of suffering; our confusions about connection and disconnection.

My work seeks meet our experiences of suffering with an authentic wrestling with the right kind of problems; that is, those which ask questions, the asking of which and the attempts at answering have deep and consequential meaning that continue to generate profound meaning in our lives.

The work seeks to alleviate existential suffering by offering moments of contemplation of beauty and connection even in some of the most unusual places.

It’s seeks to help us turn and face our fears rather than run from them. The images arrive from a desire to find places of connection rather than being caught and confused by apparent separations encountered in every day reality.