A History of Staring at Ceilings

For my entire life reaching as far back as I can remember, which varies at times in range, from perhaps the age of three or four and up, and occasionally even earlier, to those times before the acquisition of language, before the capacity to name.

I have distinct and specific memories of lying on the couch, or a bed for one reason or another: perhaps having been told to take a nap, or as an adult choosing to take a break, perhaps feeling depressed or sick, and other times savoring the beauty, the simple beauty of light as it fell through the window, or from a light on the ceiling, as it met the corner of the room, and sometimes the window.

These moments have always and still do contain an entire universe of possible emotions, a sense of deep connection to all that is; this deep feeling of potential, and at the same time a deep anxiety at the possibility of missed potential, missed opportunity.

I realize I still have that same exact set of feelings now.

The feelings vary; sometimes anxiety, sometimes joy, sometimes anticipation, the full range of human emotions.

My work arises from a desire to understand the ongoing stream of felt experiences along the full emotional continuum. This occurs via direct experiential processing, an ongoing , intuitive development of a visual photographic vocabulary.

This lexicon seeks to make visible the invisible: what do we see and how does it impact us and how are we in relationship to it?

It confronts the fundamental reality of suffering; our confusions about connection and disconnection.

My work seeks meet our experiences of suffering with an authentic wrestling with the right kind of problems; that is, those which ask questions, the asking of which and the attempts at answering have deep and consequential meaning that continue to generate profound meaning in our lives.

The work seeks to alleviate existential suffering by offering moments of contemplation of beauty and connection even in some of the most unusual places.

It’s seeks to help us turn and face our fears rather than run from them. The images arrive from a desire to find places of connection rather than being caught and confused by apparent separations encountered in every day reality.

Relationship to and Experience of Urban Landscape

The Passage of Time

Some photos are not of a single decisive moment but actually light up with the passage of time. And sometimes that glow is beyond astonishing.

And even more, sometimes we can pause and recognize that same glow which is our own divine light shining from within. We can see this in ourselves and all the beings it’s whom we share this planet, this time.

Amazing!

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Fisk Power Station: Pilsen

“In my years of photography I have learned that many things can be sensed, seen, shaped or resolved in a realm of quiet, well in advance of, or between, the actual clicking of shutters and the sloshing of films and papers in chemical solutions. I work to attain “a state of heart”, a gentle space offering inspirational substance that could purify one’s vision. Photography, like music, must be born in the unmanifest world of spirit.”

Paul Caponigro (photographer). ___________________

Fisk Power Station decommissioned owned now by NRG which is supposedly converting it to natural gas. We need to think hard how to balance power needs with sustainability and not let greed drive everything. 

#environmentalphotography #chicago #pilsen #onlyoneearth #naturalgas #wakeup

A Cold Day’s Night in Photographs

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What is it about light and dark, lights flaring against a dark night, a red ribbon in the wind? Lately I’ve been looking at the world as I imagine a painter might, some painter somewhere anyway. Maybe it’s the old Josef Albers color theory coming out from long ago stash in the brain. I don’t know. But I can tell you this: cold as it was, I didn’t feel it at all, rather completely absorbed in looking, looking at the ever-changing fields of color, light, pattern that came and went as quick as the breath. I hope you like it and find something here to return to again. If you do, you can always click the follow button or like if you so moved, and let me know someone out there is watching too. Peace. Hillary

Better version of Goethe-Color-Wheel.jpg, shar...
Image via Wikipedia
color theory: mixed signals